Go slow to go fast

When we gather a search team, often the tendency is to capitalize on initial enthusiasm to get as much done as quickly as possible. That's totally understandable. After all, novelty begets energy, and we don't want to waste it. But if we haven't taken the time to build our team and outline our process, even a small bump can drain that momentum and derail our collective work.

That's why it's important - even though it's counter-intuitive - to start slowly. Develop relationships among the search team members. Learn where each person is coming from, what their reasons were for agreeing to serve, what skills and experience and ideas they bring, what they need from others in order to make their best contributions, and how they deal (or don't) with conflict. When those involved in the search have this kind of context for their teammates, they will be able to engage one another more quickly and effectively when difficulties arise.

In addition to interpersonal processes, agreeing on procedures at the outset can make work go faster down the road. What is the future story we're striving for? How does everyone plan to participate in the work? What is our timeline? How will we come to agreement on major decisions? How will we ground our work in God? How will we hold one another accountable? What will we do if we come to an impasse? Intentionality at the front end can ease - if not prevent - many stresses that pop up as humans, with our anxieties and agendas, cooperate.

Note that slow movement at the start might prompt questions from the team and the congregation such as "why are we wasting time on this ‘soft’ work?" Be prepared to explain how deliberateness serves both the overall goal and the speed of the work that is to come.

In what ways do you need to pump the brakes in order to do some of this foundational work? Though it might seem tedious at times, your relationships and your efforts will greatly benefit. If you need help with going slow, this trust-building workshop is worth your consideration.

Photo by Gary Bendig on Unsplash.