Follow your curiosity

In a recent TED interview, author Elizabeth Gilbert talked about creativity in terms of following our curiosity. We are often told to follow our passions, she said, but that is advice that can lead to unnecessary risk and discouragement. Attending to our curiosity, in contrast, is more gentle. It involves asking questions before making big leaps: what's going on in me/us? What is God nudging me/us toward? What would it mean for me/us to make a major change? What would I/we need in order to take that step? The ultimate outcome might be the same, but it would derive from discernment and come with a more settled spirit. (The point is not to abandon passion, after all, just to probe it a bit.) Or the queries might lead to a previously-unconsidered way of being faithful to God.

This curiosity is not just useful for individuals but also for groups such as search teams. Sometimes teams want to drive right in to their work, or they are drawn to a particular candidate from the first encounter. Asking questions can help flesh out the process, provide needed touchstones, situate the work in service to God-given vision, and allow us to explain why the candidate of choice is the best fit. These reflection points might also reveal that the team is not yet ready to get into the meat of a search or that a candidate - while charismatic - does not meet essential criteria, saving a lot of heartache down the road.

As you consider what is going on in and around you (as an individual and as part of a collective), where would a bit of curiosity help you listen deeply, plan faithfully, and move forward confidently?

Photo by Joe Green on Unsplash.